Appalachian Trail plate sales surpass $1 million mark

Mar 18, 2014

The Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) is pleased to announce that revenue received from the sale of Appalachian Trail (A.T.) specialty license plates in Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia recently exceeded the $1 million mark. The A.T. License Plate Program was established in 2005 in order to support the ATC in its work to sustain the Trail into the future.

“The Appalachian Trail Conservancy says thank you to all of the Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia residents who have purchased the Appalachian Trail specialty license plate,” said Morgan Sommerville, ATC regional director. “Funds from the plates support a number of projects that preserve and protect the Appalachian Trail.”

Money generated from the sales and renewals of A.T. specialty license plates in Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia is used to complete a broad range of projects along the A.T.’s southern region through the License Plate Grant Program. Projects that receive funds include trail and facilities maintenance, environmental monitoring and natural heritage projects and education and community outreach.

In addition to Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia, Virginia also offers its residents A.T. specialty license plates. Depending on the state, a portion of the cost of each plate (between $10 and $20) is returned to the ATC.

For more information about the A.T. License Plate Program, visit www.appalachiantrail.org/plates.

 

About the Appalachian Trail Conservancy

 

The ATC was founded in 1925 by volunteers and federal officials working to build a continuous footpath along the Appalachian Mountains. A unit of the National Park Service, the A.T. ranges from Maine to Georgia and is approximately 2,185 miles in length. It is the longest hiking-only footpath in the world. The mission of the ATC is to preserve and manage the Appalachian Trail – ensuring that its vast natural beauty and priceless cultural heritage can be shared and enjoyed today, tomorrow, and for centuries to come. For more information, please visit www.appalachiantrail.org.

 

 

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