Haywood Waterways celebrates Earth Month

By Haywood Waterways Association | Mar 26, 2014
Photo by: Yvonne Hannah Volunteers plant trees and shrubs along Richland Creek.

To help raise awareness of one of the earth’s most critical resources and to celebrate Earth Day, April 22, Haywood Waterways is offering a full month of activities to explore, enjoy and help care for Haywood County waterways. Events include a watershed hike, stream clean-ups, a rain barrel workshop, storm drain stenciling and invasive plant removal.  Call Eric Romaniszyn for more information at 476-4667 or info@haywoodwaterways.org.

 

March 29 (Saturday): Fish Fest

Location: Haywood Community College

Time: 1:00 to 6:00 pm

Cost: FREE for the youth fishing clinic (RSVP required)/ Fish fry is $7 and free for the clinic’s youth participants

Description: It may be three days early but consider it a great kick-off for Earth Month. The Haywood Community College Wildlife Club is hosting their 1st Annual Fish Fest Youth Fishing Clinic and Fish Fry at the college’s Millpond from 1:00 to 6:00 pm. The free youth fishing clinic is from 1:00 to 4:00 and is open to children 6 to 12 years of age. The clinic will introduce lessons in water safety, fishing ethics, respect for the outdoors and much more. The clinic is a great environmental education opportunity for local community youth. Space is limited to 40 youths. Registration is required and includes fishing clinic, personalized Fish Fest t-shirt and fish dinner. Parents must be present. To register, contact Jenny Carver at the HCC Natural Resources office - jcarver@haywood.edu or 627-4560. Haywood Waterways will lead a benthic macroinvertebrate sampling station for anyone that wants to get a little dirty flipping over rocks and learning about aquatic bugs. The fish fry is from 4:00 to 6:00 pm; the cost is $7 but it’s free for the fishing clinic youth. All proceeds benefit the HCC Wildlife Club.

 

April 10 (Thursday): Bethel Middle School Science Fair and Community Night

Location: Bethel Middle School, 630 Sonoma Road, Waynesville

Time: 6:00 to 8:00 pm.

Cost: FREE

Description: This event is part of the North Carolina Science Festival of events occurring across the state between March 28 and April 13. The Festival highlights the educational, cultural and financial impact of science in NC. Join BMS for this inaugural event and check out the fantastic projects completed by 175 of their students. Kids and adults will also have the chance to participate in several student hands-on STEM labs, as well as activities run by local educational organizations. Their goal is to demonstrate that everyone can “do science” - and enjoy it!  Haywood Waterways will share information on our water quality monitoring programs, including results, and how we use the data.

 

April 12 (Saturday): Frog Level Storm Drain Stenciling

Location: Frog Level, Waynesville, meet at Panacea Coffee Company

Time: 9:00 to 10:30 am.

Cost: FREE

Description: Stormwater is the #1 cause of pollutants getting in local waterways. Most of the time the culprit is rain but sometimes it’s by poor human judgment. Come help stencil stormdrains around the Frog Level area with “Don’t Dump – Drains to Pigeon River” to help stop this dumping. If there are enough volunteers, they will even tackle some trash clean-up along the roads, parking lots, and Richland Creek. Stenciling supplies, gloves, trash bags, pick-up sticks, and refreshments provided.

 

April 12 (Saturday): Stream Clean-Up, Canton Recreation Park

Location: Meet in the parking lot by the Canton Recreation Park baseball field.

Time: 1:00 to 2:30 pm

Cost: FREE

Description: Trash makes its way into local streams by stormdrains, wind, and careless people. Much of the trash, particularly plastics, can take hundreds of years to decompose. Besides being ugly, trash is bad for wildlife and can clog stormdrains and pipes, which can cause flooding as well as problems for all water users. Come help improve the Pigeon River by picking up trash. Gloves, trash bags, pick-up sticks, and refreshments provided. Please wear close-toed shoes and clothing that can get wet and muddy.

 

April 15 (Tuesday): Western Carolina University Earth & Wellness Celebration

Location: University Center Lawn

Time: 11am-2pm

Cost: FREE

Description: Western Carolina University is hosting this event featuring live music, local vendors, health screenings, games, and free giveaways.  There are over 30 confirmed vendors, community & student groups participating. The event is open to the public.

 

April 22 (Tuesday): Earth Day Celebration

Location: Haywood Community College

Time: 12:00 to 3:00 pm

Cost: FREE

Description: Come visit Haywood Community College’s annual Earth Day event. There will be lots of exhibits and demonstrations in the new Creative Arts building, including children’s readings, recycled art contest, guest speakers, and documentary viewing.

 

April 22 (Tuesday): Building a Rain Barrel Workshop

Location: USDA Agricultural Service Center, Conference Room A, 589 Raccoon Road, Waynesville

Time: 6:30 to 8:30 pm

Cost: $50 for materials (RSVP required)

Description: A hands-on demonstration of how to build a rain barrel. Rain barrels are great tools for watering gardens, reducing stormwater pollutants, and lowing home water bills. All participants will leave with one complete barrel and the knowledge to build more. RSVPs are required at 828-476-4667 or info@haywoodwaterways.org. Mail checks to PO Box 389, Waynesville, NC 28786.

 

April 24. Rain Barrel Sale Day

Location: USDA Agricultural Service Center, 589 Raccoon Road, Waynesville

Time: 3:00 to 6:00 pm

Cost: $80.25 per barrel, includes tax

Description: Haywood Waterways is hosting a drop-in session to purchase rain barrels. Barrels can also be purchased anytime at the Haywood County Cooperative Extension or Haywood County Chamber of Commerce offices, or by contacting Haywood Waterways at 828-476-4667 or info@haywoodwaterways.org.

 

April 26 (Saturday): Stream Clean-Up, Lower Richland and Raccoon Creeks

Location: Meet at the end of Industrial Park Drive Waynesville off Asheville Rd (Business 23)

Time: 9 to 11:00 am

Cost: FREE

Description: Trash makes its way into local streams by stormdrains, wind, and careless people. Much of the trash, particularly plastics, can take hundreds of years to decompose. Besides being ugly, trash is bad for wildlife and can clog stormdrains and pipes, which can cause flooding as well as problems for all water users. Come help improve Richland Creek, Raccoon Creek and Lake Junaluska by picking up trash. Gloves, trash bags, pick-up sticks, and refreshments provided. Please wear close-toed shoes and clothing that can get wet and muddy.

 

April 26 (Saturday): Big Creek Watershed Hike

Location: Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Big Creek parking lot; take I-40 to the NC- TN border, take EXIT 451 and drive past the Waterville hydro-electric plant, follow the brown park service signs past the intersection at Mt. Sterling Gap and into the park.

Time: Noon to 2:00 pm

Cost: FREE

Description: Hikers will meet in the parking lot at noon and hike to Midnight Hole, which is an easy 3-mile round trip to the waterfall and back. The trail was a logging road or rail for logging the park and is even accessible for jogging strollers. Blair Bishop from Haywood Community College will discuss forestry, forest management practices, and the history of logging in that section of the park. Eric Romaniszyn from Haywood Waterway Association will discuss watershed ecology and water quality issues and solutions in Haywood Co. Snacks will be provided afterwards. Info on Big Creek can be found at http://hikingthecarolinas.com/bigc.php.

 

April 29 (Tuesday): Invasive Plant Species Removal and Native Plantings

Location: Vance Street Park, Waynesville

Time: 2:00 to 5:00 pm

Cost: FREE

Description: Invasive plants are a significant threat to forests, wildlife, and water quality. Invasive species strangle native species and form a dense understory that prevents other species from growing. They can also cause trees to fall and when the canopy is open, it opens up new habitat for invasives. Because wildlife is not adapted to exotic species, there is less food for both terrestrial and aquatic animals. Invasive often lack the deep, stabilizing root systems that help hold stream banks together and stop erosion. Come help remove Japanese knotweed, multiflora rose, oriental bittersweet, Chinese privet, and Japanese honeysuckle from the streambanks of Richland Creek at Vance Street Park. Bring a good pair of boots and gloves and prepared to get dirty. All tools and refreshments provided.

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