Retail group wants fair tax

Jun 19, 2013

Members of the Alliance for Main Street Fairness (AMSF) in North Carolina sent a letter to their Congressional delegation urging them to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act.

The signatories consist of a wide spectrum of constituencies, including small business owners, members of state retailers associations and chambers of commerce, local elected officials, and consumers, all who want to see this commonsense solution signed into law.

“This is a critical issue for small businesses,” the letter reads.  “They not only struggle to match the tax-free prices their customers can find online, but also frequently find themselves in the frustrating position of having their stores used as showrooms by online shoppers.  Their time and resources are being used up to make sales for their out-of-state competitors.”


“Opponents of the Marketplace Fairness Act have tried to argue that it imposes a new tax on consumers.  But that is simply not true.  The Marketplace Fairness Act will impose no new tax or tax increase of any kind, but merely create a method that states and communities can use to collect taxes they are already owed.  For over two decades, the Internet sales tax loophole has prevented these taxing entities from receiving the legitimate revenue they need to fund essential public services for our residents leaving a revenue hole that taxpayers have had to fill.”

The Marketplace Fairness Act received a bipartisan vote in the U.S. Senate in May, and similar legislation is already pending in the House of Representatives with over 60 bipartisan cosponsors.  Main Street retailers and taxpayers agree: a free market economy with a level playing field benefits everyone.  It is time for the House to do its part to close the sales tax loophole.

 

Comments (1)
Posted by: Charles Harrell | Jun 27, 2013 17:00

I doubt that Amazon or eBay collecting sales tax is going to change anything for small business. Small business needs to change their way of doing business. Part of their business should be online.  About half of my purchases are taxed because they have stores in this state. Brick and mortar stores are going to find that most of the appeal of online purchasing is convenience not evading taxes.  When they finally stop whining and figure this out, their stores will be brick and mortar dust. Maybe small business should consider reviewing their customer service policies before it's too late.



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